My work generated positive media coverage for important clinical, research, business and educational initiatives and helped to manage the fallout from crises along the way. The work done around the Marathon and its aftermath was recognized locally and nationally, resulting in several invitations to address professionals in nationwide presentations from Boston to Philadelphia, Washington and Utah.

It was supposed to be a weekend getaway to New York City, a chance to escape the Boston Marathon crowds. It vanished in a non-stop flood of phone calls, texts and e-mails. My media contacts — local and national — wanted to know about the explosion at the Marathon finish line. From that moment — and for the next 10 days, it was a marathon of another kind, a race to manage a crisis for Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center as it

unfolded in real time.

Everyone agrees that patient safety and quality are the most important things doctors and hospitals must provide to their patients. Being transparent on the road to achieve those results is crucial to the task. When Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center set a goal to eliminate preventable physical and emotional harm it did not shy away from a full accounting of its progress. That included admitting to its mistakes as well as charting the steps – big and small – to reach that goal.